Emergency Medicine News

Dr. Schmitz received the 2014, Teacher of the Quarter-July-September 2014.


Faculty PA earns emergency medicine specialty credential : Click here for complete story. (2-06-2014)


Dr. Miguel Fernández was quoted in this story on the synthetic cannabinoids bust: Click here for complete story. (6-26-13)


Dr. Schmitz did us proud by appearing on Texas Public Radio to tell the public about heat injuries. Her segment picks up at about 6:45 of the 1st segment here: Click here for complete story. (6-24-13)


June 5, 2013: Univision 41 Dr. Fernandez on Stings and Bites: Click here for complete story. (6-05-13)


When lightning strikes: Speedy reaction critical for victim's survival "It can stop your heart. It can affect your heart, stop it cold. It can give you brain injuries or other neurological problems. And those can persist. And a third thing, lightning can toss you, kind of like getting knocked off a horse," said Dr. Bruce Adams. Click here for complete story. (4-30-13)


Ban sought on synthetic drug blamed in Fredericksburg teen's death: Among those consulted by treating physicians was Dr. Miguel Fernández, director of the South Texas Poison Center. Fernandez said overdoses of synthesized psychedelic hallucinogens known on the street as "25i" and "Europa" are increasing.1Click here for complete story. (4-29-13)


16-year-old suffers heart attack, dies after snorting drug: WOAI interviewed Miguel Fernández, MD, Director, South Texas Poison Center was interviewed regarding the death of one young man in Fredericksburg and the hospitalization of a second teenager after they snorted a crystal powder form of a mail-order drug. Dr. Fernández says that it's too easy to find synthetic or manufactured drugs like this online; it's not illegal and teens don't always exercise good judgement. He reminds the public that the poison center is always there to help, the call is free and is anonymous. Click here for complete story. (4-24-13)


K2 growing problem in San Antonio: According to the San Antonio Police Department, use of K2 or Spice (synthetic cannabinoids), often disguised as incense, tobacco, bath salts, or potpourri, are a growing problem around San Antonio. Miguel Fernández, MD, Director, South Texas Poison Center, says, "It's not 'marijuana', it's chemicals. Call them synthetic 'cannabinoids', they attach to the same parts of the brain (as marijuana), but people looking for euphoria aren't the ones being called in with irregular heart rates, halucinations or seizures." Click here for complete story. (4-23-13)


Miguel Fernández, MD, Director, South Texas Poison Center, interviewed by New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung for National Poison Prevention Week: According to Dr. Fernández, the South Texas Poison Center receives at least 200 calls a day for anything you could think of regarding 'poisonings', from relatively minor to extremely serious. The trained professionals in the poison control center field all types of calls, 24 hours a day. Click here for complete story. (4-23-13)


Miguel Fernández, MD, Director, South Texas Poison Center, in KSAT-12 story on synthetic marijuana: There is a growing concern among San Antonio law enforcement and physicians about the use of synthetic marijuana, also known as 'spice'. "We've seen people have seizures and go completely comatose after smoking some of this stuff," said Dr. Miguel Fernández. Click here for complete story. | Visit South Texas Poison Center website (4-2-13)


Spring Breakers treated for seizures: State health officials were looking into reports Tuesday of what could be an unusual number of people having drug-related seizures and hospitalizations during Spring Break last week, including four people who had to be put on ventilation. South Texas Poison Control Center Director Miguel Fernández, MD, confirmed that hospitals reported more than 100 people transported for treatment. Dr. Fern├índez, MD, said local toxicology tests showed the substance contained alcohol and cocaine, but more advanced tests are needed to show other drugs. Even so, bath salts and Ecstasy may not show up on a drug test, he added. View Dr. Fernández's interview on KENS5 | Read MySA.com article | WOAI Radio interview, article | Visit South Texas Poison Center website (3-20-13)


Miguel Fernández, MD, Director, South Texas Poison Center, quoted in Texas Tribune article: The agency that oversees the state's 911 system and our poison control centers has too much money — and not enough. The Commission on State Emergency Communications provides poison control services for the entire state and 911 services for primarily rural areas; funds are provided by fees paid by every Texas cell phone owner and wireless service user. Click here to read the article in the Texas Tribune.    (2-26-13)


Carmen Jiminez, South Texas Poison Center Educator, passed away Monday, December 31, 2012 after a difficult battle with cancer. Services for Carmen were held on Saturday, January 5, 2013 at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in San Antonio. Carmen's years of superior knowledge and invaluable experience in the implementation of education programs for school age children, adults and the elderly were invaluable. Her organizational skills and bilingual communication abilities enabled her to work with a wide variety of audiences, and she will be missed not only here at the Health Science Center but also in the communities she served in San Antonio and South Texas. Please keep her family in your thoughts and prayers during this difficult time.(1-8-13)


New Emergency Medicine residency program announced: Bruce Adams, MD, Director of the Center for Emergency Medicine, said beginning a residency in emergency medicine is critical because of the shortage of emergency doctors in the United States, and especially in South Texas. This is the first civilian emergency medicine residency program in South Texas. The Center for Emergency Medicine (formerly known as the Division of Emergency Medicine in the Department of Surgery) in the university's School of Medicine, has partnered with University Health System (UHS) for this new residency program.     Read HSC News story | View KENS5 story | Learn more about the Emergency Medicine Residency Program | Center for Emergency Medicine (10-3-12)


S.A. finally gets emergency doc training program After nearly 20 years of fruitless efforts, San Antonio's medical school will finally begin training civilian doctors in emergency medicine - becoming the last major city in the country to have such a residency program, officials said Thursday Click here for complete story. (9-28-12)


The School of Medicine, the Department of Surgery and Division of Emergency Medicine are delighted to announce the transition of the Division of Emergency Medicine to the Center for Emergency Medicine effective September 1, 2012. As announced in March, Bruce D. Adams, M.D. was recruited as Chief Designate of the Division of Emergency Medicine effective 9/1/2012. With the creation of this new Center, Dr. Adams will become the inaugural Center Director. His extensive leadership experience will serve him well as he takes the reins of Emergency Medicine at the School of Medicine and develops this extremely important academic and clinical endeavor. Please join us in both welcoming Dr. Adams to the School of Medicine and congratulating him on his expanded role as a Center Director. Read complete announcement (8-22-12)

WOAI Radio
http://radio.woai.com/pages/localnews.html?feed=119078&article=10453383

KSTX Texas Public Radio
Dr. Schmitz did us proud by appearing on Texas Public Radio to tell the public about heat injuries. Her segment picks up at about 6:45 of the 1st segment here: http://tpr.org/post/source-summertime-heat-safety-takeaway-comes-kstx

San Antonio Express-News

S.A. finally gets emergency doc training program

KENS Channel 5

First-ever San Antonio civilian Emergency Medicine Residency program to open

News 4 WOAI

Spurs Game Health Effects

KSAT
University Hospital begins ER medicine residency

 
Contact: WebTeam@uthscsa.edu
Updated: 10/7/2014
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